A10 AIR: The Many Faces of Identity Theft (Video)

Our behavior and attitude toward applications impacts not only corporate security, but our personal and financial security as well.

Negligent behavior when interacting with business and personal apps can open the door to a vast number of threats – one of which is identity theft.

According to the A10 Application Intelligence Report, or A10 AIR, our global research project that examines the use of apps and how our attitude, behavior and experience involving apps impacts personal and corporate security, more than one in 10, or 13 percent, of respondents say they’ve been the victim of identity theft.

And the younger the respondent, the more likely they’ve had their identity stolen. According to the report, nearly one in five, or 19 percent, of A10 AIR respondents between the ages of 21 and 30 report having their identity stolen, while only 2 percent of those over 50 say they’ve been an identity theft victim.

Globally, respondents from China report the most frequent identity theft, with two out of five respondents, or 39 percent, citing they’ve had their identity stolen.

Respondents in South Korea (23 percent), followed by the U.S. (16 percent), had the second and third highest rates of acknowledged identity thefts, respectively.

France and Germany, meanwhile, have the lowest rates of respondents who say they’ve been victims of identity theft, with just 5 percent saying their identities have been stolen.

Identity theft can, in many cases, be traced back to casual application use. When this occurs within corporate networks it creates mounting challenges for network and security operations teams, who strive to provide end-users the access they need while maintaining the control necessary to keep the organization and its data safe.

For more information the impact our app-blended lifestyles have on business and corporate security, download the A10 Application Intelligence Report now. In A10 AIR, you’ll learn how our behavior and attitude regarding apps impacts business and how organizations can ensure safety and security amid a culture shifting toward an app-fueled life.

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